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This is the digital showcase of London based creative designer James Hayter.

His work encompasses installation, print and digital design. If you are interested in viewing a full portfolio please get in touch. This site is optimised for safari, chrome and firefox.

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Gut Club

Print design


Project completed whilst working as a part of Tartan Walrus.

The Gut Club are a group of artists aiming to educate others about the gut and how this extremely complex and intelligent organ should be respected and nurtured.

The aim of this project was to design and art direct the visual messaging for the Gut Club’s final Friday event at the Bun House, Peckham.

The event was featured in the BBC culture show's report on the South London art scene.

© Tartan Walrus 2011

Gut Club

AV installation


An Audio visual installation was also created for the final Friday event as a sensory response to the main themes explored by the Gut Club.

The video footage was projected into an eight foot diameter gut-like circular aperture and was accompanied by a 10 minute spoken monologue referencing various Gut club literature. Video coming soon.

© Tartan Walrus 2011

The Death

of Video

Installation


‘The Death of Video’ is an installation dealing with the humble video machine's struggle for survival against the likes of newer technologies, such as DVD and Blue Ray.

The purpose built installation sets a scenario in which a VCR is sentenced to death — travelling along a motorised conveyor belt and eventually falling from a 5th storey window — crashing into pieces on the concrete below. Click here to view a video of the installation.

© Tartan Walrus 2011

Alluding

to Illusions

Identity/print design


In collaboration with fashion curator Sam Hayden.

‘Alluding to Illusions’ is a sensory exhibition concept celebrating and analysing the works of Alexander McQueen. The brief was to conceptualise, design and art direct the visual identity and then apply the branded assets to print media.

The identity — as does the show — aims to dissect the context and purpose of McQueen’s objects and themes, further exploring the main merits of his work.

© Tartan Walrus 2011

1095 Days

of Design

Branding/signage


In collaboration with Linus Kraemer.

A grid of 48 squares — representing each individual exhibitor — was laser cut onto a singular acrylic rectangle and photographed for the exhibition flyer. A further 48 acrylic cards were produced, each with one square from the grid cut from it. These cards were then used as name tags for each of the 48 participants.

© James Hayter 2011

Liquid

Typography

Experimental typeface


In Collaboration with Linus Kraemer.

An automated system was set up which dropped ink onto the glass screen of an overhead projector. The system was devised to allow for no human interference. Combinations of red, blue and yellow ink produced 26 unique abstract forms. These forms refer to the individual characters of a typeface. The project establishes a new visual language that defines the characters of a typeface by form and colour. The image is an example of one individual character. Watch a video of the process here.

© James Hayter 2011

Camberwell

Arts Festival

Installation/print


In collaboration with Linus Kraemer and THIS IS Studio. Sponsored by Laura Ashley. Website programming by Thom Stoodley.

‘Make your own damn festival’ was the theme for the 2009 Camberwell Arts Festival. Adhering to the D.I.Y concept, wallpapered screen-prints were designed to advertise the festival. These wallpapers were then pasted on exterior walls around Southwark. A brochure and website were also designed based on the wallpaper aesthetic. View the website here.

© James Hayter 2011

Whose Blood

Identity design


Project completed whilst working as a part of Tartan Walrus.

This visual identity project was created for the site specific pre-victorian theatre production ‘Whose Blood’.

Set in 1832 the play focused on the state of pre-victorian surgical procedures along with themes of social and racial hierarchy. The play was performed in the Old Operating Theatre, London Bridge.

© Tartan Walrus 2011